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Rest Pause / High Rep / Negatives High Intensity Training for Senior Athletes


bill.admin
(@bill-admin)
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Joined: 2 years ago
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The funny thing about lifetime training is the change that occurs over time.

This year I turned 64 years young. What I have noticed over the long term is that my recovery is not as quick as it used to be and although strong for my number, shit still feels heavy.

Even now, knowing my body, I still experiment with a number of things. What I have found is that higher rep training to failure, employing a form of rest pause and some negative really helps and is kind to my joints and muscle, inducing growth and gain still (although much is muscle memory) as I age.

Something that I have added is extreme stretching due to the work Dante Trudel has pioneered in his own search for excellence. The combination has allowed me to make reasonable continued progress.

I have always been a balls to the wall heavy high intensity powerbuilding athlete who enjoyed heavy rest pause one rep sets, followed by a 7 second pause, continuing for a maximum of 5 total reps… these days not so much so. It takes me a long time to recover after a session like that, despite how short it is.

It was Dante Trudel who got my attention. What if you go to failure with high reps, say 12-15 to failure, rest say 10 – 15 seconds and then take another and then again. With each rep taken stretch at the bottom, no momentum… 2 to 3 second pause at the bottom, how we used to train the bench getting ready for a competition. You still do one set with rest pause to failure except 3 high rep tries instead of 5 heavy singles. Then, depending on the exercise, end with an exaggerated negative, say 15- 30 seconds.

Well that is exactly what I have been doing except for things like deadlifts which can create a lasting injury if something gives, very unstable to use this sort of thing on.

Squats work great, so do things like dips, rows, decline benches, reverse pulldowns, curls, and pushdowns to name a few.

I have had a neck injury where my left biceps has not quite recovered. Using this sort of style, with cable curls my biceps have started recovering getting bigger and stronger.

I have also found that I can tolerate 1 workout per 5-7 days. Anything more my progress is marginal and in most cases I over train, having to take a layoff.

I like grouping Chest and Back together one workout and the next legs and arms. I don’t usually directly hit shoulders as they get so much stimulation from chest and back.

I also employ pre exhaustion on arms. I lead with a direct biceps exercise and go directly to a compound negative only exercise. Same with triceps. The compound exercises give you the most bang for your buck.

On big exercises like declines I normally get a total of almost 30 reps, shooting for 12-15 reps on my first rest pause.

Give it a try, see what you think. Take the rest you need to recover and progress, this is not in stone.

Let me know what you think!

Bill Sahli, High Intensity Strength Training.

HIT it hard and go home, rest and let it happen.


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dcshores
(@dcshores)
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Joined: 2 years ago
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That is very interesting Bill! You know I like high reps. Recently I have been training with an IsoChain from Dragon Door doing isometrics. Isometrics are amazing for strength and super easy on the joints because there is so little movement in the joints.  I am only three workouts in but rapidly getting stronger. Lets talk soon Buddy!

 


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Lifter
(@lifter)
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Joined: 2 years ago
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You never cease to amaze me with your never-ending search for more effective ways to train. I too was smitten with DC's principles back in '03. But never had the success some of his other trainees did. No matter how I tweaked his principles, I could only blast for 3 weeks tops. Even aided by Dante's former right-hand man; InHuman, who was baffled why I only lasted briefly. What he overlooked was the immensity of intensity levels ... thanks to hypnosis. Being able to relax when squeezing out the final reps, takes my intensity levels to a whole other realm.

The final revelation was when he sent me Dante's pre-client form, which was based around "usage". Most of the questions on the first page, is vested in how much "assistance" one is using. That final piece of the jigsaw explained why Dante's principles are designed as they are, and are unsuitable for the average guy.

Isn't it funny how we all arrive as the same juncture over time? Now in my late 50's, I have moved my reps upwards, with 12-15 reps being my average. Unlike my younger years, where 6-8 was a given. Those days are long gone, but I tend to get more muscle stimulus on higher reps. Versus strength PLUS muscle on lower rep quotas. The Godfather of HIT; Casey Viator, always said "the magic doesn't start happening till you reach 10 reps". And if you look at the infamous Colorado Experiment, reps of up to 20 was the mainstay. 

With the reduction of synovial fluid which inevitably dwindles over time, with the aging process, it makes perfect sense to push reps upwards. Plus, it allows plenty of in-built warm-up reps. A win-win situation, all way round.

I'm keen to hear how this works out for you Bill. More power to you! 


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bill.admin
(@bill-admin)
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Joined: 2 years ago
Posts: 12
Topic starter  

So I have been using this rest pause style since my original post in July. I have made a lot of gains in strength and muscle and am currently on a 2 week layoff. At this point I will reduce the volume and frequency.

This type of training is super productive in every way. My new split will be 2-3 exercises once a week.

The exercises I use are squats, deads (I don't do rest pause on these), high pulls, pull-downs, declines and dips. I throw in curls sometimes at the end of the workout.


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